The Old’s Old Records #2: Janis Joplin’s Pearl, Singin’ In The Rain soundtrack, Men At Work’s Business As Usual & Santana’s Self-titled

My friend William has posted the latest from his vinyl collection. I really appreciate the Men at Work. In the U.S., most of us are familiar with “Who Can It Be Now?”, and I will be singing it for the rest of the day. 🙂

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Here’s the next four in this collection which are a couple of hippie albums, 50’s musical and 80’s Aussie one hit wonders! Keelin @ Bicthfork is now up to her vinyl day nine, linked here but it’s only second one by me this Wednesday morning:

 Business As Usual by Men At Work is the very first Aussie album here, my parents are a little more mainstream in Aussie music than me which might be a good thing for some listeners/readers? At least everyone should know them and I wouldn’t need to go into details who the hell they’re? In Australia they did have more than one hit but everyone oversea’s with only know Down Under song but I’m picking opening track Who Can It Be Now? 

Singer-songwriter Colin Hay total wins the most C-19 lyrics today with Who Can It Be Now? A lot or almost all the words if…

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“Illegitimi non carborundum” Vibes with The Budos Band

Illegitimi non carborundum is a mock-Latin aphorism, often translated as ‘Don’t let the bastards grind you down’. The phrase itself has no meaning in Latin and can only be mock-translated as a Latin–English pun.

Today, I feel disappointed and tired on so many levels today. The Budos Band strikes me as the proper fellas to see it through.

Saint Cloud by Waxahatchee

Today, I had a wonderful exchange with my friend TK:

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TK and I have been friends for 12 years. Our friendship is very much marked by the aughts.  Having first been introduced on MySpace, we met for the first time in person in New Orleans when he was visiting with his wonderful friends and bought my 2008 Bonnaroo ticket. We’ve stayed in touch ever since with ebbs and flows mostly because I ebb in most of my relationships (still working on this, friends).

Suffice to say, he is wonderful friend and knows me well. Thus his recommendations are some I hold in highest regard. When he texted me about the latest Waxahatchee album, Saint Cloud, I immediately turned it on.

I love this album and captures all the feelings and cultural trappings I feel so personally to boot.

 

Guest Post: “Music or Misery” with Tommy Barbee

Tommy examines the musical chicken-egg question.

Today, we’re trying something new because what better time to experiment in the middle of a societal breakdown?

Tommy Barbee is my former professional colleague, current colleague over on South Side Hit Pen, a daily source of creative inspiration, an excellent partner in conversation (ranging from modern philosophical and moral issues to extremely low brow humor), and, most importantly, we can get into fights and recover. I would certainly refer to him as one of my besties. Is the feeling mutual? Who’s to say? 🙂

Recently, he shared some musings of his own about this strange time and how it relates to a question originally posed by High Fidelitya book turn movie in 2000 (and seminal Chicago film) now turned show on Hulu. Enjoy.


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“What came first, the music or the misery?” – High Fidelity

As I sit here observing the now commonly accepted social distancing in affect as we attempt to offset the latest wave of impending doom that 2020 has thrown society’s way, I find myself coming back to this question. It’s a simple question, but an indelible idea that has stuck with me since my formidable teenage years. Sure, like every other angsty teenage boy that is now on the older fringe of Millennials, I spent more time than I’d care to admit listening to the likes of Weezer, Radiohead, and Coldplay mixed in with the more socially accepted hip-hop music of the time.

Was I anxious and depressed because I listened to OK Computer and later Kid A one too many times? Sometimes it felt that way, and I still refuse to listen to a Radiohead album from beginning to end so as not to spark a sudden bout of existential crisis.

As an adult that has distanced himself from the awkwardness of adolescence, I find myself feeling as isolated as ever in this time of unwavering panic. Once again, I’m turning to music to make sense of things.

It’s true, too much Elliott Smith can bring you down. Even so, he conjures such depth of emotion that somehow your life, or a generational experience, can be summed up in mere minutes. Right now, finding something– anything– that can help reflect or make sense of the emotions felt today is exactly the kind of “misery” needed.

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Feel free to connect with Tommy on Twitter: @kindableu.

“Queen of the Rodeo” by Orville Peck

I’m a little obsessed with the video for “Queen of the Rodeo” (with a little bit of “Falling Roses”) by Orville Peck.

The video is stunning and fun. The song itself is refreshingly very positive: “The song and video are about allowing yourself to get out of your own way, beat your demons and crown yourself queen of the rodeo.”

I will let the video stills speak for themselves:

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