Tag Archives: David Allan Coe

A Strong Woman’s Heart: “I Owe You Nothin'” by Emily Nenni

Just the other day, I posted praise for Phoebe Bridger’s gentle but blunt diss.

Today, I want to appreciate another woman who is a master at asking someone to take a hike: Emily Nenni, a rising honky tonk star that comes from Nashville.

Her Spotify bio is wonderful:

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Here is the first rack of hers that I heard. It’s called “I Owe You Nothin'”:

I love this song, and the instrumentals remind me of  David Allan Coe or Hank Williams Jr. However, I also almost always enjoy a good “I’m done,” song by a woman.

Ask me for something,
Well get in line,
I owe you nothin’,
You can get with the times.

She has another great song along the same lines called “Hell of a Woman”.

I drank some te-kill-ya,
They said it would heal you,
But I nearly lost my reigns,
And Lord how I cried.

I’m a hellllll of a woman. x2

I’ve been disrespected,
But they’ve been corrected,
It’s expensive to own how you feel,
Cause talk is cheap,
And that’s not me,
Maybe once in a while when the liquor’s flowin’ free.

Anywho, this wonderful gal came out with a new EP called Long Game today. If you are into some honky tonk or girl power tunes, I definitely recommend you check her out.

Intersectionality in Country Music

As I mentioned in my Raw Yee-Haw post, country and honky-tonk has always had a variety of rebels. I use the term “variety” because the type of rebellion is really up-for-grabs. For example:

  •  David Allan Coe: He really deserves his own post: spent a large part of his life in prison, lived in a hearse, says the “n-word” quite a bit (yikes), and made a country-metal album with Pantera. Many of his songs cover issues of class-consciousness.
  • Dixie Chicks: America’s sweethearts until they pissed off much of the conservative country fandom when they were critical– rightfully so– of George W. Bush and the Iraq War. The Dixie Chicks held their ground, never apologized, and, honestly, it was awesome. “Not Ready to Make Nice” was a song that was a result of the incident. It’s also a song that has gotten me through some of my most pissed off times.

These are two different presentations of rebellion with quite different motivations. I could discuss so many other examples, but these are two that come to my mind more immediately.

Continue reading Intersectionality in Country Music